Joshua Barney


Josh joined the Health System in 2011 as a writer and editor. He previously worked at The Daily Progress newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., first as a reporter and then as an editor. He is a graduate of UVA. Josh primarily covers research and the School of Medicine.

Job Title: Senior Marketing & Public Relations Specialist
Phone: 434.243.1988

A New Guide for Explorers of the Submicroscopic World Inside Us

May 22, 2018

Researchers from the University of Virginia have established new guidelines for scientists mapping out the body molecule by molecule to help us better understand how our cells use metals such as iron and magnesium to maintain good health. The guidelines ultimately will benefit the battle against diseases such as cancer, assist in the development… read more >

Pioneering New 3D Cancer Model to Speed New Treatments

May 7, 2018

A scientist at the School of Medicine, working with local biotech company HemoShear Therapeutics, has created a 3D cancer model that can replicate the complex nature and behavior of a real tumor. The model will help researchers better understand the disease and accelerate the development of new and better treatments.

The multicellular model… read more >

Thoracic Surgery Recovery Program Benefits Patients, Slashes Opioid Use

April 24, 2018

A special recovery program for thoracic surgery patients developed and implemented at the University of Virginia Health System is getting patients home sooner while decreasing both healthcare costs and opioid use, a review of the first year of the program shows.

According to the new review, the program:

Reduced the use of morphine equivalents… read more >

How a Cancer-Causing Virus Clings to Human DNA Like a Bur to a Sock

April 22, 2018

Using a homemade, high-tech microscope, scientists at the School of Medicine have revealed how a cancer-causing virus anchors itself to our DNA. That discovery could pave the way for doctors to cure incurable diseases by flushing out viruses, including HPV and Epstein-Barr, that now permanently embed themselves in our cells.

“The reason we can’t… read more >

Pediatric Oncologist Honored on Top 10 List of Clinical Research Achievements

April 20, 2018

A School of Medicine researcher’s pioneering work in childhood cancer has been honored as one of the top 10 clinical research achievements of 2017.

Daniel “Trey” Lee, MD, a pediatric oncologist at UVA’s Children’s Hospital, has been developing a new gene therapy to battle treatment-resistant leukemia in children and young adults. Known… read more >

Gene Affects How Some Women Store Fat – And Ups Their Diabetes Risk

April 17, 2018

A naturally occurring version of the gene KLF14 affects some women’s body fat distribution and puts them at significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes.
The gene variation specifically affects tummy and hip fat, causing cells to become fewer but larger.
Women who are pear-shaped as a result of this gene don’t have… read more >

Why Is My Blood Pressure Sensitive to Salt? This Gene May Explain Why

April 12, 2018

Researchers at the School of Medicine and George Washington University School of Medicine have discovered how a gene variant found in 48 percent of the population can limit the body’s ability to eliminate excess salt after high-salt meals.

Having this gene variant increases the odds of having blood pressure that is sensitive to salt,… read more >

This Could Let Doctors Customize Brain’s Immune Response to Diseases

April 11, 2018

The University of Virginia neuroscience lab that discovered that the brain connects directly to the immune system now has found evidence that doctors could load up the brain with custom blends of immune cells to battle genetic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

The UVA researchers were able to “engraft,” or establish, immune cells… read more >

Infant Death Study Reveals Unsafe Sleep Practices Among Babysitters, Relatives, Others

April 2, 2018

Babies who died in their sleep while being watched by someone other than parents often had been placed in unsafe sleep positions, such as on their stomachs, or in unsafe locations, such as a couch, a new infant death SIDS study has found.

In response to the troubling findings, the researchers are urging parents to… read more >

After Decades of Work, UVA Launches Human Tests of Lung Transplant Drug

March 26, 2018

In the culmination of decades of research at the University of Virginia Health System, doctors have begun human testing of a drug they hope will one day save many lives among lung transplant recipients.

The drug, regadenoson, is already commonly used to image cardiac patients’ hearts. But the UVA research suggests it could be… read more >